Thursday, May 29, 2008

What future for Israel

The news today that leader of the Israeli Labour Party, Ehud Barak, is calling for Prime Minister Ehud Olmert to step down, is the latest crisis to hit Israel. It comes at a time when one of Israel's leading intellectuals, Amon Rubinstein a former minister of education and justice recently went on Hebrew Radio to say he anticipated that the Israeli state would not survive. His view is shared by a number of intellectuals who fear that the external threat, lack of confidence in the state's future and severe polarisation amongst society's components may all lead to Israel's demise.

Abraham Tayrosh wrote in February that one of the signs of collapse is that the Jewish Agency has stopped trying to convince Jews around the world to migrate to Israel. Rovi Rivlin (Likud) reports that an increasing number of Israelis are working to obtain European passports to be used in fleeing Israel if they need to. Muli Beilig sees that Ben-Gurion's vision of a "melting pot" society has failed miserably with ethnic and cultural polarisation. Nahom Burnei believes that although Israel is strong militarily and economically, it is unable to provide security for its citizens and is also the only state in the world whose mere existence is a source of doubt.

The full text of the article "This state cannot survive" is available here.



The tragedy for me is that it doesn't have to be like this. A true commitment to a viable state for the Palestinians (whatever happened to the roadmap?) and a true commitment to equal rights for all her citizens, would contribute to Israel's future security. I am increasingly drawn to the view that perhaps the only hope now is a one state solution, with some sort of Northern Ireland type power sharing.






7 comments:

St. Michael Traveler said...

One Nation: The Federal State of Israel-Palestine

We have had 60 years of experimenting about the Israeli- Palestinian struggle. The region would need help before we will be dragged into a World War III.

The basis for Israeli claim to the region is that once there were Semitic Jewish tribes who formed a state before rise of Assyrian Empire. This state was controlled by Syria, Persian Empire, Greece, Romans, Arabia, Turkish, France and England. The population later became mostly Muslim. Jews mostly left the region during the period of 2000 years.

The United Nations created Israel after the World War II on the land settled mostly by Muslims and Christians.

Thus, those who had lived in the region for 2000 years had to be displaced to create space for Zionist invaders. The act created struggle between Israel and the original population.

We should be looking at the region as a Federal States with one government elected by all of the people. As one nation the region may have a much better chance of peace.

candor man said...

Where in the middle east other then Israel is there democracy?.

steven said...

Linda you seem a well informed Lady. I am Suprised you are unawere, that in Israel all citizens have eqael rights regardness of race or creed.

Arab Palestinians, vote and are repesanted in the Kenesat.

All citizens including Bedouin in the Negev have access to state health and wellfare services.

steven said...

Linda you seem a well informed Lady. I am Suprised you are unawere, that in Israel all citizens have eqael rights regardness of race or creed.

Arab Palestinians, vote and are repesanted in the Kenesat.

All citizens including Bedouin in the Negev have access to state health and wellfare services.

Linda Jack said...

Steven

You are right, Arab Palestinians are represented in the Knesset, but Bedouin have no local democracy at all. Those who live in the unrecognised villages have no access to water, electricity and no roads. Access to education and health care is limited, crops and houses are regularly destroyed by the Green Patrols. In those circumstances your assertion about equal rights is totally misplaced. If you would like to accompany me on my next visit to see for yourself you would be very welcome. Contact me via my Facebook page.

steven said...

Linda


I was awere that issues did exsit,and sorry if implied overwise with regards to the Bedouin.

In fact recently I hared a senior Israeli diplomat, answer a question on this subject.

He answered " The Isaeli government had difficulty allocating resources, bareing in mind the nomadic lifestyle of the Bedouin.

"Temporary settlments, pose security and an enviromental risks".

Might the issues be similar to those of the Aboriginal in Australia,or the gypsies in Eurape?.

Do you have any involement with the Bedouin in Arab lands, and how to they fare in compression?.

I will be going to Israel soon, " though don t think I would be brave enaugh to venture in to the Negev Mid Summer".

Steven

Linda Jack said...

Steven

You really should try and visit, although of course it will be very very hot. If you want to venture let me know, my friends at Mossawa can arrange it for you. Re the comment of the diplomat - this is perpetuating the myth. Many of the villages have been there pre 1948. Those that weren't are as a result of the Bedouin being forcefully removed from their lands and settled by the Israeli government in new villages. So it is a very different situation from the Gypsies, tho maybe closer to the Aborigines. Do let me know if you want to visit.

Linda